Pricing Per person

  • All (1)
Twin

IC - Interior

NZ $17,989

Inclusions

- 73 night voyage onboard Sun Princess
- Main meals & entertainment onboard
- Port charges & government fees

BONUS:
- Receive an AU$1685 onboard credit per stateroom*

CAPTAIN'S CIRCLE SAVINGS (PAST PASSENGERS):
- Save up to $880 per person*

Valid: 11 Oct 2018 - 30 Apr 2019

Cruise Description

Onboard credits, past passenger savings & more!

73 Night Cruise sailing from Sydney to Auckland aboard Sun Princess.

Sun Princess truly lights up the seas, serving up tantalizing cuisine, dazzling live entertainment and new experiences with our Discovery at SEA™ programs. Relax in The Sanctuary, a tranquil haven reserved for adults, or put your feet up at Movies Under the Stars®, whatever you decide to do, your time on board will be unforgettable.

Highlights of this cruise:

Sydney
As your ship passes Harbour Heads, you are presented with the shimmering skyline of Sydney - hailed by many seafarers as "the most beautiful harbor in the world." Two prominent landmarks, Harbour Bridge and the sail-like curves of the Sydney Opera House, grace the backdrop of this picturesque harbor. There is a wealth of adventure waiting in Sydney - from its cosmopolitan city center to miles of beautiful beaches and the Blue Mountains.

Australia's oldest and largest city was born in 1788 with the arrival of the "First Fleet" transporting 760 British convicts. Today, Sydney is the largest port in the South Pacific and is often voted the most popular destination in the South Pacific.

Brisbane
Once considered the "country cousin" among Australian cities, Brisbane is today the nation's third-largest metropolis - and one of the most desirable places to live in the country. Lying on the banks of the meandering Brisbane River, this cosmopolitan city boasts elegant 19th-century sandstone buildings, a lively cultural scene and superb parklands. Brisbane is also your gateway to uniquely Australian adventures, be it the theme parks of the Gold Coast or Queensland's dazzling beaches.

The beaches south of Brisbane form Queensland's Gold Coast. Travel tip: Brisbane is pronounced "Bris-bin."

Hong Kong
Skyscrapers form a glistening forest of steel and glass, junks and sampans ply the busy harbor waters, and the green, dragon-crested hills of Kowloon beckon. Welcome to Hong Kong, one of the world's great travel destinations. Now a semi-autonomous region of China, Hong Kong - literally "Fragrant Harbor" - has lost none of its charm, excitement or exoticism. Modern skyscrapers and luxury hotels climb the slopes of Hong Kong Island. Narrow streets are crammed with noodle vendors, fortunetellers and bonesetters. The endless array of shops offer the visitor everything from hand-tailored suits and ancient porcelain to the latest consumer electronics. And everywhere more than seven million people are moving at a breathtaking pace in one of the world's great monuments to capitalism, commerce and enterprise.

The former Crown Colony has enough attractions to last a lifetime. To take in the entire spectacle, head to Victoria Peak for panoramic views. Enjoy lunch on one of the city's floating restaurants. Walk down one of the crowded streets to take the city's rapid pulse. And whether you think you are in the mood or not - shop. After all, you are in the duty-free capital of the world.

Hubbard Glacier
Nicknamed the "Galloping Glacier," this east Alaskan glacier is rapidly advancing toward the Gulf of Alaska into a pristine area known as Disenchantment Bay. In fact, its movement temporarily formed a natural dam that twice closed off nearby Russell Fjord from the bay, but the intense water pressure building within the fjord-turned-lake has thus far been enough to explode through the wall of ice.

The largest tidewater glacier in North America, Hubbard Glacier measures 76 miles long and plunges 1,200 feet into the depths of the bay. Its immense beauty and phenomenal blue hues are enchanting, even from afar. But it's when your cruise ship draws closer that its towering surface really impresses, dwarfing even the uppermost deck on your ship at a whopping 40 stories high. There, with the snowcapped mountains serving as a glorious backdrop, you'll have a prime viewing spot from which to witness the glacier calving, as it often expels icebergs the size of 10-story buildings-imagine the splash!

The area around Hubbard Glacier is also renowned for its wildlife, where whales, harbor seals and otters swim, brown bears, moose and black-tailed deer roam ashore, and a wide variety of seabirds soar gracefully across the sky.

Skagway
Skagway was the gateway to the gold fields for the thousands who flocked to Alaska and the Yukon with the hope of striking it rich. Skagway may have boasted the shortest route to the Klondike, but it wasn't the easiest.

Over 100 years ago, the White Pass route through the Coast Mountains and the shorter but steeper Chilkoot Trail were used by countless stampeders. Many a would-be miner perished on the treacherous Chilkoot Trail.

The gold rush was a boon and by 1898, Skagway was Alaska's largest town with a population of about 20,000. Hotels, saloons, dance halls and gambling houses prospered. But when the gold yield dwindled in 1900, so did the population as miners quickly shifted to new finds in Nome.

Today, Skagway has less than 1,000 residents. It still retains the flavor of the gold rush era.

Ketchikan
Ketchikan is known as Alaska's "First City" because it's the first major community travelers come to as they journey north. Located on an island, Ketchikan began life as an Indian fishing camp. The name Ketchikan comes from a Tlingit phrase that means "eagle with spread-out wings," a reference to a waterfall near town.

In the early 1900s, when gold was Alaska's claim to fame, fishing and timber industries were established in Ketchikan. The growth of these industries helped make this Inside Passage port Alaska's fourth-largest city.

Visitors to Ketchikan will be intrigued by its rich Native heritage, which includes the world's oldest collection of totem poles at Totem Heritage Center. The Haida, Tlingit and Tsimshian are all a part of the city's colorful history. Ketchikan, with its abundance of salmon, is also a sportfishing paradise. Sightseers will be impressed with both the scenic town and its surroundings, especially Misty Fjords National Monument.

Vancouver
It seems unlikely that a character named "Gassy Jack" Deighton would be responsible for one of the most beautiful cities on the continent. But that's history for you.

During the gold rush, Gassy Jack saw a chance to make money from the hordes of miners on their way to the Yukon. The saloon he built became the focus of the shanty town known as Gastown. From that ragtag group of shacks, modern Vancouver was born. The provincial government persuaded settlers to change the name of the town to Vancouver, after Captain George Vancouver, who sailed the region's waters in 1792.

Canada's third-largest city, Vancouver is a cosmopolitan place with a European feel and a personality all its own. It's a community with a rich ethnic mix - including the second-largest Chinatown in North America - and stunningly beautiful parks.

Seattle
Seattle is a young city with a rich history. Settlers first landed at Alki Point in 1851 and named the area after Sealth, the Suquamish Indian chief who befriended them. Rebuilt after the Great Fire of 1889, "The Emerald City" has a legacy of vision and strength. Seattle has hosted two World's Fairs (1909 and 1962) and is the birthplace of two modern marvels, Boeing and Microsoft.

Known for its rainy climate, Seattle actually averages less annual rainfall than many East Coast cities. The mild weather, spectacular natural surroundings and rich cultural diversity attract visitors from around the world.

San Francisco
Cable cars, the Golden Gate rising from the fog - welcome to San Francisco, arguably the most romantic and cosmopolitan city in the United States. San Francisco has it all: a colorful history, superb restaurants, sophisticated museums, world-class shopping, and that elusive air of romance and abandon that's part of the tang of the city.

San Diego
Known as a place of infinite beauty, affectionate locals and endless sunshine, San Diego has become one of America's favorite cities. Located in the southwest corner of California, close to the border of Mexico, San Diego has a distinct cross-cultural feel, part sun-drenched Mediterranean atmosphere, part south-of-the-border zest and part quintessential California beach town.

The history of San Diego is rooted in its Spanish and Mexican past. San Diego was declared the capital of upper and lower Baja only four years after Mexico gained its independence in 1821. Less than thirty years later, the United States declared war on Mexico and within two years the Treaty of Guadalupe Hildalgo was signed creating the current borders between Mexico and the United States.

The city continues to prosper with a population exceeding one million. World-renowned attractions such as the San Diego Zoo, the Salk Institute, Sea World, La Jolla and the San Diego-Coronado Bay Bridge have created a strong tourism industry for the area. But undoubtedly what attracts visitors from around the world is the city's breathtaking natural beauty, superb coastline and near-perfect weather.

Honolulu
Home to nearly half a million people, Honolulu is Hawaii's state capital and only major city. The city of Honolulu and the island of Oahu offer a wealth of historic, cultural and scenic attractions. Waikiki Beach and Diamond Head are two of the city's enduring symbols. Pearl Harbor, site of the USS Arizona Memorial and the "Punchbowl," are haunting reminders of the tragic events of December 7, 1941, when the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor forced America into World War II. Honolulu is also home to the historic Iolani Palace, the official residence of Hawaii's last royals. Beyond the city lie tropical rain forests, the Pali Lookout and the North Shore known for its surfing beaches.

A draw card to visitors of all ages, from all corners of the globe, Honolulu's appeal ranges from it's magnificent beaches, countless well-stocked shops, tempting restaurants and a multitude of historic, cultural and scenic attractions.

Papeete
Tahiti is not just an island - Tahiti has always been a state of mind. The bustling capital of Tahiti and her islands, Papeete is the chief port and trading center, as well as a provocative temptress luring people to her shores. Immortalized in the novel "Mutiny on the Bounty," who could blame the men of "HMS Bounty" for abandoning their ship in favor of basking in paradise? And what would Modern Art be without Tahiti's influence on Gauguin and Matisse? Today the island is a charming blend of Polynesian "joie de vivre" and Gallic sophistication. But venture out from Papeete and you find a landscape of rugged mountains, lush rainforests, cascading waterfalls and deserted beaches.

Contrasting with other French Polynesian ports, Papeete's coastline initially greets you with a vista of commercial activity that graciously gives way to both black and white-sand beaches, villages, resorts and historic landmarks.

Pago Pago
Pago Pago Bay is one of the most dramatic harbors in the South Pacific, a region known for dramatic landscapes. Eons ago, the massive seaward wall of a volcano collapsed and the sea poured in. Today, dramatic mountain peaks encircle the deep harbor.

The capital of American Samoa, Pago Pago is more village than city. The town is dominated by looming Mt. Pioa, whose summit draws moisture-bearing clouds, earning it the nickname of "The Rainmaker." Indeed, Pago Pago draws more than its fair share of rain - the island of Tutuila is a vision of deep, verdant green.

Pronounced "Pango Pango," this island paradise awaits exploration.

Auckland
Straddling a narrow isthmus created by 60 different volcanoes, New Zealand's former capital boasts scenic beauty, historical interest and a cosmopolitan collection of shops, restaurants, museums, galleries and gardens. Rangitoto, Auckland's largest and youngest volcano, sits in majestic splendor just offshore. Mt. Eden and One Tree Hill, once home to Maori earthworks, overlook the city. One of New Zealand's fine wine districts lies to the north of Auckland.

Auckland served as New Zealand's capital from 1841 until 1865, when the seat of government moved to Wellington.

Terms & Conditions

*Valid for sales from 11 Oct 2018 until 30 Apr 2019, unless sold out prior. Prices are cruise only, per person, share twin, based on an Interior Stateroom (Cat. IF). Other stateroom categories may be available at a surcharge. Prices are inclusive of all applicable discounts, port handling & government fees (which are subject to change). Subject to limited availability at time of booking. PAYMENT: A 10% deposit is due within 3 days (by midday) of booking. A second deposit of 20% is required 160 days prior to departure. Full payment is due 90 days prior to departure. ONBOARD SPENDING CREDIT is in AUD per stateroom, valid for the first two guests only & is non-refundable, non-transferable & cannot be redeemed for cash or used in the medical centre or casino. CAPTAIN’S CIRCLE MEMBER SAVINGS are only available to past guests of Princess Cruises®. Prices are correct at time of publication (05 Oct 2018) & are subject to change or may be withdrawn without prior notice. Valid for new bookings only & not combinable with any other offer. Further terms & conditions apply, check with your travel agent.